The Persistence of Imagery

By Dianne Aprile, Spalding Low-Residency MFA Creative Non-Fiction Faculty
Aprile

Dianne Aprile & Mary Lou Hess

My friend and collaborator, Mary Lou Hess, has etched hundreds of plates and pressed thousands of images over the course of her long career as a fine-art printmaker. Continue reading “The Persistence of Imagery”

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The Journey and Responsibility of Historical Persona Poetry

By Jeanie Thompson, Spalding Low-Residency MFA Poetry Faculty

JT color

Today, poets are exploring how to engage readers with history by entering the lives of characters. This increasingly well-regarded genre is called historical persona poetry.

Continue reading “The Journey and Responsibility of Historical Persona Poetry”

The Edifying Art of Editorial Reading

By Ellyn Lichvar, Spalding Low-Residency MFACoordinator, Managing editor of The Louisville Review

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At Spalding, every student in our MFA program gains hands-on experience in editing and publishing by working on our national literary journal, The Louisville Review. TLR has been in existence since 1976 and we’ve published writers from Stephen Dunn to Jhumpa Lahiri, from Mitchell L.H. Douglas to Louise Erdrich. Continue reading “The Edifying Art of Editorial Reading”

Three Friends, Three Stages, NYC

By Roy Hoffman, Spalding MFA Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Faculty

Whenever I visit New York City one of my pleasures is attending theater. In the brisk days of late February this year, I had the delight of scurrying out of the cold into two venues where works by friends took away the chill and replaced it with dramatic heat unfolding in front of me. Continue reading “Three Friends, Three Stages, NYC”

Why Write? Bearing the Weight of Fear in the World.

By Eleanor Morse, Spalding Low-Residency MFA Fiction Faculty
Burdened Children 1930 by Paul Klee 1879-1940

Burdened Children (1930), Paul Klee

Last week, the day after seventeen students were killed in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, I received an anguished email from one of my students, which began like this: “Yesterday was a day of terrible loss…and writing or creating feels pointless to me, at this time. I’m just reaching out…How do you keep going on days like this? I am struggling…the lofty notions of making the world a better place through storytelling are just falling flat today.” Continue reading “Why Write? Bearing the Weight of Fear in the World.”

Music and the Quickening of Story

By Susan Campbell Bartoletti, Spalding Low-Residency MFA Faculty (Writing for Children & Young Adults)

Susan 2015

Recently, I was sitting with a group of women writers, and the conversation turned to music concerts.

“What was the first concert you went to?” asked one of the women. Around the table, various artists and band names were tossed out and the women oohed and ahhed: Aerosmith. Guns ‘N Roses. Bruce Springsteen. Even some oldies: the Beach Boys. Neil Diamond. James Taylor. Joni Mitchell. Carole King.

My first concert? Continue reading “Music and the Quickening of Story”