Lessons on Death Row

By Catherine Berresheim, Spalding MFA Creative Nonfiction Alum

I’ve been in and out of a variety of prisons for over the last decade. Even though I am accustomed to being in these penitentiaries, I wasn’t prepared for the foreboding atmosphere of Unit Two at Riverbend Maximum Security Institute—otherwise known as Death Row. Nor was I expecting to encounter the abundance of artistic talent within those cinder block walls and the lessons they held on teaching and practicing the art of creative writing.

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Hug a Tree, Write a Page

By Fenton Johnson, Spalding MFA Creative Nonfiction and Fiction Faculty

California Valley Oak

 “Nothing induces silence like experience,” wrote Flannery O’Connor, an observation that comes to mind more often as I grow older.  On occasion I have considered that the best way to teach creative writing might be for the workshop to read together, first in silence and then aloud, a paragraph by a master, then sit with that paragraph in silence for the next two hours.  These thoughts come particularly to mind now because, in teaching my most recent Spalding intensive, I neglected to conclude my workshop with the admonition with which I conclude all my workshops, i.e., forget everything I’ve said, open your heart, go out and look at the world, and write.

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REFLECTIONS ON TRAVEL WRITING

By Roy Hoffman, Spalding MFA Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Faculty

Roy Hoffman in Amsterdam (Credit Nancy Mosteller Hoffman)

When you pack your bags for your next trip, whether a few hours from home or as far away, to an American traveler, as Buenos Aires, Rome, or Edinburgh, take along your travel writer’s sensibility. You’ll already have the tools in place—pen and paper, laptop and camera—so making a record of where you go, what you see, eat, and learn, is not a practical but perceptual challenge.  Our senses become heightened by the excitement of travel, the allure of different landscapes, languages and foods. As writers we note it all in colorful detail in our journals and e-mails home. But how can we shape this material into articles or personal essays for a larger audience? Here are some tips—and questions—to keep in mind. Travel writing ranges from the service end—how to get there, where to find it, how to buy it—to lyrical musings about place. Travel writing also incorporates stories about interesting individuals in far-off locales. If you’ve got a publication in mind for your travel story, figure out what it’s about, who its audience is. Write for that reader alongside you, shepherding him or her along.

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Four innovative writers join the faculty of Spalding’s School of Creative and Professional Writing

The School of Creative and Professional Writing at Spalding University is pleased to announce the hiring of four new faculty members to teach in the school’s low-residency graduate writing
programs.

Jason Kyle Howard joins the faculty in the areas of creative nonfiction and professional writing. Howard is author of A Few Honest Words, an essay collection that explores how the land and culture of Kentucky have shaped American music through the work of musicians including Dwight Yoakam, Jim James, and Naomi Judd, among others. He is author of the essay and oral history collection Something’s Rising (co-written with Silas House). A widely acclaimed music writer, Howard has interviewed musicians spanning all genres including Yoko Ono, Carly Simon, Patty Griffin, and the legendary folksinger Jean Ritchie. His essays and commentary have appeared in the New York TimesOxford AmericanSalonThe NationThe MillionsUtne Reader, Paste and Sojourners and have been featured on C-SPAN’s Book TV and NPR. He previously served as senior editor for Equal Justice Magazine. Howard is currently editor of Appalachian Heritage, a literary quarterly based at Berea College, where he teaches and directs the creative writing program. He lives in Lexington, Kentucky, and holds an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts.

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Spring 2019 MFA Residency at Spalding Features Heart Berries, Shakespeare, and an Amble through Louisville’s Historic Cemetery


By Kathleen Driskell, MFA Chair at Spalding University’s School of Creative and Professional Writing

Great things continue to happen for graduate students in the School of Creative and Professional Writing, home of the nationally distinguished Spalding low-residency MFA program. One thing I enjoy most about teaching is working with our MFA team to shape a meaningful, rigorous, and cohesive curriculum for residencies. And I think this upcoming spring MFA residency is going to be especially rich and helpful for our writing community.

Continue reading “Spring 2019 MFA Residency at Spalding Features Heart Berries, Shakespeare, and an Amble through Louisville’s Historic Cemetery”

Making it New

By Dianne Aprile, Spalding School of Writing Creative Nonfiction Faculty

“Don’t write with a pen. Ink tends to give the impression the words shouldn’t be changed.”

Richard Hugo

The poet Richard Hugo published those lines many years ago to underscore the necessity of flexibility and revision in the writing process. Presumably heeding his own advice, Hugo used a pencil to jot down his first-draft thoughts on the subject. But if ever there was good reason to trade lead for ink, this final version is it. Hugo’s words deserve the permanence of a waterproof, indelible ultra-bold Sharpie.

Why? Well, because his message is so important, there should be no risk of it being rubbed out or overlooked.

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Thorns Will Be Necessary: The Appeal of the Flawed Character

By Beth Ann Bauman, Spalding MFA Faculty, Writing for Children and Young Adults

One of my favorite TV shows is the HBO crime drama “The Night Of.”  It’s tough and gritty and co-written by the inimitable Richard Price.  I’m going to detour here and mention how at a New Yorker festival years back, I first met Price when he and another author gave talks about their writing. The first was affected and kept tinkling the ice in his glass in a soft, actorly way.  He was sort of full of it.  Price, on the other hand, bounded onto the stage when it was his turn, looking like he was wearing a pajama top.  He looked at us and said, “Hey, did you know there’s a really good bar across the street?”  Well, he had our attention.

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My Role Model Is a Roll of Toilet Paper: Writing with Passion and the Limits of Machines

By Nancy McCabe, Spalding Low-Residency MFA Creative Non-Fiction/Fiction Faculty

Fall 2014 photo (1)

When my daughter was in sixth grade, she was assigned an essay proposing a new holiday honoring an under-recognized historical figure. She thought and thought about this, considering favorite writers, political figures, ordinary people. Continue reading “My Role Model Is a Roll of Toilet Paper: Writing with Passion and the Limits of Machines”

CUT, PASTE, REPEAT: Collage Writing

By Dianne Aprile, Spalding MFA Creative Nonfiction Faculty

GordianKnot

Gordian Knot by Larry Calkins

…the collage form encourages us to write in a distilled, imagistic, unconsciously meaningful way…

A few years ago, I started thinking about teaching writing classes at an art center near where we live on the east side of Seattle. At first, I thought I’d like to lead ekphrastic writing classes, making use of the art exhibited at the Kirkland Arts Center, which draws to its gallery the work of artists from all over the country—and beyond.  Continue reading “CUT, PASTE, REPEAT: Collage Writing”

What Cross-Genre Exploration looks like for Spalding MFA Students

By Katy Yocom, Spalding MFA Associate Director

oldbooks

Cross-genre exploration has been a hallmark of the Spalding low-residency MFA in Writing curriculum since the program was launched in 2001. But while many students arrive eager to explore across genres, others aren’t so sure. “I want to be able to focus on my own area,” they’ll say.

Fear not, trepidatious writers. You absolutely will. You can spend every single residency and independent study in your own area, if you want. Continue reading “What Cross-Genre Exploration looks like for Spalding MFA Students”